Experts Warn that Flood-Damaged Appliances Should be Replaced
09/23/2009

Heating and Air Conditioning systems subjected to the recent heavy rains and flooding should be inspected by a certified HVAC technition.

Online PR News – 23-September-2009 – – HVAC Repair Atlanta - With yesterday’s heavy rains and flooding, Atlanta homeowners need to take several precautions before attempting to restart, repair or salvage heating and cooling equipment. Homeowners should not be too anxious to get things back to normal after a storm because improper maintenance and preparation can lead to costly HVAC repairs.

All flood-damaged heating, cooling and electrical appliances should be replaced, rather than repaired, warns the Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association (GAMA). The organization also strongly recommends that all work on flooded equipment be performed by a qualified, licensed contractor, not by homeowners.

"Controls damaged by flood water are extremely dangerous," notes GAMA President C. Reuben Autery. "Attempts to use equipment with defective gas or oil control devices can result in fires, flashbacks or explosions. And in the case of electric appliances, the result can be injury or even death from a powerful electric shock." The GAMA official noted that devices at risk include water heaters, furnaces, boilers, room heaters and air conditioners.

The Association stresses that the repair of flooded appliances and related systems (including damaged venting and electrical connections) is not a job for the do-it-yourselfer, no matter how skilled. This is particularly true of control valves, according to GAMA officials. These components are manufactured to extremely close tolerances. Once submerged in flood water, they must be replaced. Field repairs should never be attempted by the homeowner.

Even when controls appear to be operative, the unit should not be used after flood waters recede. "It may work for a while," Autery explains, "but it will deteriorate over time. It might take a week, a month, or even a year, but once any control has been under water, it presents a serious hazard...fire or explosion in the case of gas controls, fire or shock in the case of electric equipment."

Because so many things can go wrong as a result of flood water, it's usually cheaper, and always safer to replace, rather than repair, Autery stresses. "You can have a control valve replaced, but there may be damage to other parts of the unit, like venting, piping, burners and insulation. There are just so many things that can go wrong, the wise choice is always to start over with new equipment," the GAMA official declared.

Contact HVAC Repair Atlanta at 678-391-9159 if you have any questions or are in need of assistance. Also, visit www.HVACRepairAtlanta.com or email info@HVACRepairAtlanta.com.