The Accent Coach Discusses Active Listening
03/04/2021

Active listening is an important part of the conversation and general communication. If someone isn’t listening, meaning can quickly become misconstrued.

Online PR News – 04-March-2021 – Vero Beach, FL – Active listening is an important part of the conversation and general communication. If someone isn’t listening, meaning can quickly become misconstrued. The Accent Coach, Claudette Roche, elaborates, "Active listening means you’re engaged in the conversation. It means you’re listening and following along. We’ve all likely been on the opposite end of this where you’re talking and you can tell someone isn’t actively listening. Maybe they’re looking at their phone or are distracted by something else."

Usually you’ll notice when someone is active listening. They remain neutral and aren’t judging. They are patient and don’t try to interrupt. They nod along or smile at the right times. They may ask questions to clarify. And they may summarize back as well. This shows the speaker that what they are saying is being fully heard.

Active listening shows the speaker that the listener is paying attention and understand them. Roche says, "Usually, you’ll notice when someone is active listening. They remain neutral and aren’t judging. They are patient and don’t try to interrupt. They nod along or smile at the right times. They may ask questions to clarify. And they may summarize back as well. This shows the speaker that what they are saying is being fully heard."

In fact, active listening shows trust between two people. "It doesn’t involve critical listening. I want to make this clear since this is often confused. Critical listening is where you are evaluating closely what the person is saying. You’re not technically trying to understand. Instead, you are looking to offer your opinion on what is being said. This is important to differentiate since many people make this mistake. They think they are actively listening but in reality, they are performing critical listening which is not the same thing," Roche explains.

Active listening can improve work relationships, personal relationships, and more. The Accent Coach even has some tips on how to be a better active listener. Roche says, "A few simple things for active listening include making eye contact, paraphrasing what the person is saying, ignoring your internal dialogue for the time being (that one’s hard!), being open, being patient, and asking questions."

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