Norman Dovichi of Notre Dame to speak at Bioanalytical Sensors Mtg, May 22-23, 2014, Cambridge, MA.
03/31/2014

Norman Dovichi, Grace-Rupley Professor at the University of Notre Dame, to give a presentation titled “Zone Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry at the zeptomole level,” at the Inaugural Bioanalytical Sensors Conference, May 22 & 23, 2014 in Cambridge, MA.

Online PR News – 31-March-2014 – Cambridge, MA – Norman Dovichi, Grace-Rupley Professor at the University of Notre Dame, to give a presentation titled “Zone Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry at the zeptomole level,” at the Inaugural Bioanalytical Sensors Conference, May 22 & 23, 2014 in Cambridge, MA.

Norman Dovichi received his BSc degree in Chemistry and Applied Mathematics from Northern Illinois University and his PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Utah. He played a pioneering role in single molecule detection by laser-induced fluorescence. That experience led to the development of a high-throughput capillary array electrophoresis DNA sequencer. This sequencer was licensed to ABI, who commercialized it as the model 3700 DNA analyzer, which was the workhorse instrument used in the human genome project. Dovichi was the only chemist among a dozen other scientists named as an “Unsung hero” of the human genome project by Science. He has focused his attention on the development of high-sensitivity mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

His group has completed the first comprehensive proteomic study of protein expression changes in single embryos during early stages of development. His group has also developed the highest sensitivity electrospray mass spectrometry interface, which produces 1 zmol detection limits for peptides in tryptic digests, and has demonstrated accurate mass and time tag analysis from 400 fg of an E. coli digest.

For more information, please visit www.gtcbio.com/biosensors/agenda