Companies risk irritating followers with tweets in blocks, according to Punch Communications
07/12/2010

Companies who write multiple tweets within a short space of time to increase visibility run the risk of annoying followers, enough for them to quickly unfollow them, says PR Agency, Punch Communications, specialists in Online PR.

Online PR News – 12-July-2010 – – Companies who write multiple tweets within a short space of time to increase visibility run the risk of annoying followers, enough for them to quickly unfollow them, says PR Agency, Punch Communications, specialists in Online PR.

A single tweet is competing with hundreds, if not thousands, of others on one person’s account but bombarding followers in a Twitter PR campaign can be a major irritant that can backfire on the tweeter in question. Users of Twitter are becoming even smarter when it comes to the credibility of other tweeters and are cautious of spammers and those who don’t adhere to the unwritten etiquettes of the online application.

Taking up lots of adjacent spaces on the time line is often down to dedicated twitter software which is programmed in advance or by using automated systems that compose a tweet with a link when a new page is created on a business’s website, the best example being a news release. The first method is increasingly being thought of as a type of spam and the second is lazy communications, whereby the week’s news is not being posted online at the time it was released but rather all together within the same hour.

Pete Goold, Managing Director of Punch Communications, said: “One of Twitter’s primary appeals is the personal and personable nature of connecting with individuals in real time. Tweeters are smarter than some companies think and when automated systems are used or news is tweeted in large blocks it can be annoying as well as just being overwhelming to look at. It can be a real turn off to continue to follow an account.

“Businesses using Twitter for PR purposes should always remember that if they irritate their followers, unfollowing and therefore losing that member of their audience is just two clicks away. To avoid losing credibility and gaining a negative reaction, I would recommend that tweets are created manually, over reasonable periods of time and alternately contain a mixture of worded tweets, links and those that encourage interactivity, like questions.

“Duplicate tweets are acceptable and can be key to PR strategies that are targeting people in different time zones. If users do want to tweet information or a link more than once, they should at least use alternate wording so that their followers don’t get turned off by seeing the same tweet over and over in the same day.”

For more information contact Punch Communications on 01858 411600 or visit www.punchcomms.com.

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