'Abhinav Bindra autobiography being adapted to movie'
04/25/2013

US based production house,helmed by Amit Bolakani, has brought the movie rights to Abhinav Bindra’s autobiography "A Shot at History" – rated as one of the best sports literature ever published in India -- written along with eminent sports journalist Rohit Brijnath

Online PR News – 25-April-2013 – Delhi – US based production house, helmed by Amit Bolakani, has brought the movie rights to Abhinav Bindra’s critically acclaimed autobiography "A Shot at History" – rated as one of the best sports literature ever published in India -- written along with eminent sports journalist Rohit Brijnath and published by Harper Collins India. After a shattering defeat in Athens in 2004 Bindra left no stone unturned and went to great lengths to win India's first and only individual Olympic gold at Beijing in 2008. This included hiring a marriage hall in Chandigarh to recreate the Beijing arena and many more such travails like trying Yak milk to Ferrari soles to mapping his own brain and commando training in Germany.
It was a tweet by Rahul Bose praising the book that sparked the idea to obtain rights for this book. Amit Bolakani, a New York trained actor, found the book entertaining while being insightful and along with his business partners decided to acquire the rights. ‘It's an inspiring Indian story that has cinematic appeal for a wider world audience. We are in process to determine a director for the project.’, said the young actor who has trained with coaches who've worked with Anna Hathaway, Leonardo Di Caprio amongst others, and further added that they are open to collaboration with other production houses.
About the book:

THE STORY OF A MAN WHO FOUGHT VALIANTLY TO MAKE HIS OWN HISTORY AND WITH IT, FINALLY, HIS NATION’S.

Abhinav Bindra once shot 100 out of 100 in practice six times in a row and walked out of the range unhappy. He is a perfectionist who once soled his shoes with rubber from Ferrari tyres because he thought it would help. He would wake up at 3 am to practise at his range at home if an idea suddenly struck him. It is from such obsession that greatness arrives.
Abhinav Bindra’s journey to become the first Indian to win an individual Olympic gold, and the first Indian to win a World Championship gold, is a story of single-minded passion. The Olympics has been an all-consuming journey for him ever since he was shattering beer bottles and glass ampoules in his garden in Chandigarh. No obstacle was too hard to overcome, no amount of practice too much, no experiment too futile and no defeat so severe that it made a comeback impossible. Shattered by his failure at the 2004 Athens Olympics when a gold medal seemed imminent, he changed as a shooter: from a boy who loved shooting, he became an athlete bent on redemption, a scientist who would try anything – from mapping his own brain to drinking yak milk to climbing rock walls – to win at the Beijing Olympics in 2008.
His victory was not just a personal triumph, it was a gift to his nation, a breaking down of a sporting barrier that had stood for a century. Bindra’s feat has taught his peers, and those yet to come, that an Olympic gold isn’t an impossible dream. In ranges, on fields, in arenas, Indian athletes now own a new belief, they wear the knowledge that no challenge is beyond them.
Helping to tell this remarkable story is sportswriter Rohit Brijnath, who collaborated with Bindra in producing this compelling autobiography of one of India’s greatest sportsmen.

Sports /Autobiography/Rs. 399/Hardback/252pp

Abhinav Bindra is India’s first and only individual Olympic gold medallist and also the first Indian to win a World Championship gold. Born in Dehradun, the twenty-nine-year-old shooter has won over seventy medals in the last fifteen years. Bindra has homes in Chandigarh and Delhi, but travels the world, training and taking part in shooting tournaments.Rohit Brijnath has written on sport for twenty-five years for such publications as Sportsworld, India Today, The Hindu, The Mint, BBC-South Asia website and The Age. He is currently a senior correspondent with The Straits Times in Singapore. This is his first book.

Way to go and here's hoping for a riveting film on one of India's sporting giant.