Freshwater Ecosystems :: OMICS Publishing Group
04/06/2013

Freshwater ecosystems are essential for human success, providing the majority of people’s water. The Freshwater environments are home to more than 40 percent of the varieties of seafood.

Online PR News – 06-April-2013 – Los Angeles, California – Freshwater ecosystems are essential for human success, providing the majority of people’s water. The Freshwater environments are home to more than 40 percent of the varieties of seafood. Despite their value and importance, many ponds, rivers, and wetlands around the world are being seriously broken by individual activities and are reducing at a much faster rate than terrestrial ecosystems. The New Britain regional forecasts recommend warmer and more dry conditions causing in

• Enhances in yearly conditions which range from 5-9°F.

• Improves in rates of water loss and evapotranspiration, leading to about a 21 % (in autumn) and 31 % (in winter) reduction in yearly flow in the southern and northern parts of the area.

• Reduced snow cover.

Freshwaters are also an important food source for humans. Globally, water fisheries are one of the most over utilized resources generating one fourth of the fish from only a portion of a % of the rivers.

More than 20 % of the 10,000 known water varieties of fish have become disappeared or imperiled recently. Watersheds, which catch rain fall and route it to sources and ponds, are highly vulnerable to pollution. Programs to protect water environments include planning, stewardship, education, and regulation.

• The creation of dams and water-diversion systems blocks migration tracks for fish and interrupts habitats.

• Water drawback for human use reduces and degrades habitats.

• Runoff from farming and urban areas affects water quality.

• Draining of wetlands for development reduces habitats.

The National Water Ecosystem Priority Areas (NFEPA) project was a partnership and collaborative process led by the CSIR with the Southeast Africa National Bio-diversity Organization (SANBI), Department of Water Affairs (DWA), the Water Research Commission (WRC), WWF Southeast African-American, as well as expertise from South Africa National Parks (SANParks), the South African- Organization for Aquatic Bio-diversity (SAIAB) and DEAT.

The main aim of the OMICS Group is to share scientific knowledge by publication of research articles in international journals, organizing international conferences, in addition to publishing eBooks from academics and scientific community.

website:
http://www.omicspublishinggroup.com/freshwater-ecosystems/