Kaziranga National Park Showing Good Sign of an Increase of Tiger Density
04/16/2010

Kaziranga National Park has always been a title of a noteworthy success story of preservation of one horned India Rhinoceros and other wild lives in the North East India. The park has been the homeland of the Great Indian One Horned Rhinoceros, but today it is counted among best national parks that provide the safest shelter to wild lives like tiger as well.

Online PR News – 16-April-2010 – – Kaziranga National Park ( http://www.kaziranga-national-park.com/ )has always been a title of a noteworthy success story of preservation of one horned India Rhinoceros and other wild lives in the North East India. Kaziranga National Park has been the homeland of the Great Indian One Horned Rhinoceros, but today it is counted among best national parks that provide the safest shelter to wild lives like tiger as well. Though, the Corbett National Park enjoy the status of the best home for tigers in India, but as per the recent survey conducted by the non-governmental organisation, Aranyak, Kaziranga National Park could be more better place to see tigers. Corbett National Park in Uttarakhand and the Kanha tiger reserve in Madhya Pradesh were, believed to be areas of highest tiger density, but the recent observation shows a whole new and different story.

The Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh even said a preliminary report from the second nationwide tiger census is currently underway, and things are very encouraging about Kaziranga. Perhaps, Kaziranga National Park ( http://www.kaziranga-national-park.com/ ) is showing an increase in tiger density. As per the recent studies done by Aranyak, it has been found that the Kaziranga National Park situated in Assam has 32 tigers for every 100 sq km, in comparison to the Corbett, which has 20 for the same area. This evaluation was based on the monitoring of tigers with the camera trap technology that was used by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) for conducting wide tiger census.

In the first phase, the tiger census was completed in southern India and some major parts of north India where WII scientists spotted some tigers in naxal-affected tiger reserves. However, after scientists entered naxal-affected Indravati Tiger Reserve in Chattisgarh and Palamu Tiger Reserve in Jharkhand they got tiger excreta samples. Commenting on this tragic evidence, Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh, said, “The evidence of excreta samples of the endangered Indian tiger found in the Naxal-dominated reserve area is the most unexpected news.” The second phase of this project, which involves data collection through satellite, is also in progress. Apart from this, in the third phase the Wildlife Institute of India would use the collected data for camera trapping sessions.

Adding to this, as per one of the officials of the National Tiger Conservation Authority, the probability of tigers in Kaziranga is also expected to reach around 100 to 200. Initially, Kaziranga, which is just known for its rhinos and elephants, had about 30 tigers in 1972, and 86 in 2007. Therefore, the initial indications on tiger census are definitely encouraging.

India just has an estimated tiger population of just 1,400. The effort to save the Indian tiger certainly remains a mounting task as an international demand for tiger parts has created a profitable trade option. “The recent statistic is surely an encouraging sign and many expect that Kaziranga will emerge as the best and safest place for tigers in coming days”, said one of the officials of the National Tiger Conservation Authority.

For more information about Kaziranga National Park visit http://www.kaziranga-national-park.com/