Emergency Notification Expert Offers Five Tips for Buckeyes
03/31/2010

As schools throughout Ohio hold tornado drills, and city governments test their severe weather warning systems, Jim Kennedy, CEO of Twenty First Century Communications and a renowned expert on emergency communications systems, offers a few tips and advice for fellow Buckeyes this spring.

Online PR News – 31-March-2010 – – Columbus, Ohio, March 24. Ohio’s governor had declared March 21-27, 2010 as Spring Severe Weather Awareness Week in Ohio. The National Weather Service, the State of Ohio, and Columbus-based Twenty First Century Communications urge all Ohioans to be prepared for severe weather this spring.

As schools throughout Ohio hold tornado drills, and city governments test their severe weather warning systems, Jim Kennedy, CEO of Twenty First Century Communications and a renowned expert on emergency communications systems, offers a few tips and advice for fellow Buckeyes this spring.

To start, Kennedy said the Federal Emergency Management Agency has lots of great information to help prepare for severe weather. “FEMA’ s Prepare, Plan, Stay Informed web site (www.ready.gov) is a great place to start. But based on 20-years of experience I’ve learned a number of additional tips to keep families safe and informed during severe weather emergencies” Kennedy said. Here are Kennedy’s top five tips:

1. First, make sure you have a corded telephone. If the power goes out, your cordless phone won’t work while the old-fashioned corded phone, powered by the phone line, usually keeps working. Also when severe weather hits, cell phone use goes through the roof often causing overloaded cell towers. Or if cell towers are knocked out your land line may be your only way to communicate.”

2. Stick a contact list in your wallet. Carry a copy of all important phone numbers in your wallet. If you have to leave the house or be evacuated you may not have time to grab your cell phone, so you need to keep important numbers with you. Or if the power is off for an extended period you may not have a way to keep your cell phone charged.

3. Check with your city to see if they have an emergency notification system. Sirens are great but may not be heard with the windows closed and the air conditioning running. The key in weather emergencies is the ability to get information and updates from as many ways as possible. A good emergency notification system, can call your landline, cell phone, email, and send you a text message - all at the same time and within seconds of the initial weather alert.

4. Sign up for your city’s emergency notification system, and make sure to list as many different ways to contact you as possible. Remember, your cell phone number is not registered unless you sign up.

5. If you’re a business, make sure you have a business continuity plan and that your plan includes emergency notification. Business owners need to be able to quickly communicate critical information to employees to keep employees safe and their business up and running.

Kennedy has seen his company handle all kinds of disasters. TFCC systems were used to evacuate San Diego in the path of wildfires, by the Red Cross to unite families separated by Hurricane Katrina, to assist utilities with power restoration, and even help capture a kidnapper. Kennedy concluded by adding “The best way to avoid significant problems during a severe weather emergency is to think ahead, and take steps to make sure you, your family and your business can be kept informed and updated.”

About Twenty First Century Communications
Twenty First Century Communication has been helping government agencies, emergency managers, first responders and utilities handle emergency communications for over 20 years. For more information please visit www.tfcci.com.