Online Platform to Discuss Copyright Issues Launched
11/09/2012

November saw the birth of an online platform dedicated to the discussion of copyright issues in Canada. CopyrightEnforcement.ca was launched earlier this month with the intent of attracting an audience of content professionals, copyright owners, and engaged observers.

Online PR News – 09-November-2012 – Toronto, Ontario – November saw the birth of an online platform dedicated to the discussion of copyright issues in Canada. CopyrightEnforcement.ca was launched earlier this month with the intent of attracting an audience of content professionals, copyright owners, and engaged observers.
The platform’s funder feels strongly that the conversation around copyright issues in Canada is so heavily polarized that it’s increasingly difficult for reasonable people to engage in reasonable discussion.
What we see are two opposing scenarios; one which lobbies for increasingly restrictive usage rights and the other advocating for wide open access. It’s our mandate to remain balanced. If we can provide a place for those most impacted by copyright issues, regardless of their natural bias, to speak freely, we’ve done our job.
What’s going to make this interesting is that the platform doesn’t have complete editorial freedom. “We are mandated,” says managing editor Trevor Paetkau, “to operate as a moderate voice. That doesn’t mean that we won’t express opinions, or that our bloggers will be limited in what they can say. What it does mean is that voices from across the spectrum will have the opportunity to express themselves and engage in dialogue free from editorial cant.”
Barry Logan, Managing Director of Canipre, has been waiting for just such a platform. “This makes sense,” he says, “whether it’s file-sharing, piracy or copyright, the rhetoric has the potential to heat up incredibly quickly. We’ve all seen what happens when the issue hits the media; Bill C-11, takedown issues, you name it, people don’t like it when they think that they’re going to end up on wrong side of a lawyer’s letter. There’s so much misinformation out there that something like this has the potential to turn down the heat ... and that’s good for the industry, and good for consumers.”
Still in its infancy Copyright Enforcement Canada is accepting opinion pieces, articles, and comment. Visit copyrightenforcement.ca for more info.