Dos and Don’ts of Purchasing Fishing Tackle
03/03/2010

John Norris of Penrith has been supplying fishing tackle for more than 35 years, and what they don’t know about fishing equipment is frankly not worth knowing anyway.

Online PR News – 03-March-2010 – – When it comes to buying fishing tackle, there’s such an incredible range of products to choose from that even the most experienced enthusiasts can find themselves locked in a hell of indecision.

John Norris of Penrith has been supplying fishing tackle for more than 35 years, and what they don’t know about fishing equipment is frankly not worth knowing anyway. Fly fishermen will find a wealth of advice readily available from the experienced and skilled staff in Penrith, and an excellent fly fishing catalogue is produced throughout the fly fishing season. In the shop itself, the range of stock is phenomenal, and there are always lots of bargains and special offers. It is, in short, a Mecca for the enthusiast or indeed for anyone thinking of taking up this absorbing hobby.

Your choice of what you purchase in the way of tackle will have much to do with your intentions. Again, the staff at Penrith will be more than happy to assist if you tell them your itinerary. A rod of between seven and eight feet and AFTM rating of 3, 4 or 5, for example, would be best if you are off fishing for brown trout in a small river.

Beginners face a bewildering set of choices, but a little common sense will help unravel the mysteries. It is essential to try out a new rod, or even a few of them, before settling on one, and also to get a good quality rod even if it’s a bit more expensive, as fly fishing is a delicate operation. A fly vest to keep tackle in is also a good idea. Another important consideration, once you’ve got your rod, is the weight of fly line you should use, and this in turn depends on the type of fly you’re using. A heavy fly on a thin tippet could well cause it to break off as you cast.

The weight of fly line, which is also a product of hook size, will be matched up with a particular fly rod, which will bend most effectively when that weight is applied to it.

All of this clearly ultimately depends on what you’re fishing for, and the expert advice offered by John Norris staff will guide you through a potentially frustrating minefield. But in the end, it’s really no more difficult than choosing computer or camera equipment, and should become one of the many pleasures of the hobby.