FRA Welcomes Rousseff's New Environmental Measures
06/19/2012

Following the news that Dilma Rousseff has agreed to veto parts of the controversial Brazilian Forestry Act, FRA has also welcomed Rousseff’s moves to create new nature reserves and protected land for indigenous tribes.

Online PR News – 19-June-2012 – Bainbridge Island, WA – June 15, 2012 - Following the news that Dilma Rousseff has agreed to veto parts of the controversial Brazilian Forestry Act, Forestry Research Associates (FRA) has also welcomed Rousseff’s moves to create new nature reserves and protected land for indigenous tribes.

FRA, a research and analysis consultancy, promotes forestry investment and sustainable development projects. Its analysis partner, Peter Collins, stated, "The news that Brazil's President Rousseff is opening new nature reserves is great for the forests and indigenous people of Brazil and we wholeheartedly endorse the decision."

The measures were signed into law earlier this week ahead of the Rio+20 environmental conference on 20-22 June. The conference will see major heads of state gather to discuss environmental concerns and issues that affect countries all over the globe.

In response to some claims from critics that she was generally putting the country’s economic growth ahead of environmental concerns, Rousseff stated that Brazil has become "one of the most advanced countries" when it comes to sustainable development.

Several projects that involve planting sustainable timberland plantations help the country to reach its sustainability goals. For example, the projects run by firms like Greenwood Management, which plants fast-growing non-native timber species for use as an alternative source of timber and charcoal, can help to protect native forests. FRA supports these projects and claims that investors can also make healthy returns from them.

"The timberland asset class has regularly outperformed traditional asset classes in recent years and investing in trees offers individuals the chance to get their hands on a tangible asset that can provide diversification in a portfolio," added Mr Collins.

Demand for timber and charcoal is high in Brazil and elsewhere among the world's emerging economies – thanks partly due to developing infrastructure in countries like China and India and also because of the growing steel industry in Brazil itself.

The new measures announced by Rousseff include the creation of seven new indigenous territories to help protect land used by native Amazon tribes.