Almeda University: High-Level Online Education More Accessible All the Time
06/08/2012

Harvard, M.I.T., and other highly regarded universities are banding together to create new online educational facilities. Almeda University, which provides online learning, applauds these organizations for finally recognizing the value that Internet-based learning holds.

Online PR News – 08-June-2012 – San Juan, PR – An article by Tamar Lewin in The New York Times reports that a long list of Ivy League and other educational heavy hitters are joining forces to launch new online educational resources. These resources, many of which will be free to students, are focused on expanding the reach of online educational tactics. Almeda University, an Internet-based educational organization that has provided online learning resources to students since 1997, is encouraged that these schools are finally recognizing the value of online learning—recognition that it believes to be long overdue.

According to Lewin, Harvard and M.I.T. are working together on a nonprofit educational resource called edX, which will provide free online courses from them both. Lewin cites a recent online success of M.I.T. as the catalyst behind Harvard's involvement. M.I.T. offered a course in Circuits and Electronics in March, which drew 120,000 students. Although not all of these students made it to the end of the course—about 10,000 were present during the midterm examination—the success of this class carries with it the potential of more developed, Internet-based educational offerings.

M.I.T. and Harvard officials said they would use the new online platform not just to build a global community of online learners but also to research teaching methods and technologies.

Lewin informs readers that Harvard and M.I.T. are not the only schools to embrace online learning: "This month, Stanford, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan announced their partnership with a new commercial company, Coursera, with $16 million in venture capital."

Although the core goal of these initiatives is to provide information, these schools are using their classes to further research on online education. Lewin reports: "M.I.T. and Harvard officials said they would use the new online platform not just to build a global community of online learners, but also to research teaching methods and technologies."

"Fifteen years ago, when Almeda University began offering online education, traditional universities like Harvard and M.I.T. frowned upon this extremely valuable method of information delivery," commented Richard Smith, Executive at Almeda University. "The traditionalists at Ivy League schools primarily focused on residential learning. Now, finally, department heads at Ivy League schools are embracing online learning. These are the same educators that previously sneered at Almeda University for offering distance education—once believed to be a bogus form of learning."

Almeda University was founded in 1997 as an educational resource for students interested in online learning. A cutting-edge, Internet-based educational facility, Almeda University has pioneered online learning, creating a curriculum that allows students to study within a long list of diverse programs. This Internet resource is known for its ability to work with a variety of lifestyles and learning styles, thus providing an education to individuals in many stages of life.

To learn more about Almeda University, visit www.almedauniversity.org.