The Accent Coach Discusses The Importance of Speaking Slowly
07/07/2020

When giving a presentation or a speech, many individuals talk faster - frequently due to nerves.

Online PR News – 07-July-2020 – Vero Beach, FL – When giving a presentation or a speech, many individuals talk faster - frequently due to nerves. It makes it hard for the audience to fully understand them, and it may also reduce the effectiveness of the speech or presentation at hand.

"It's easy to get caught up in your presentation without taking note of the pace of your speech. Many don’t even notice how fast they were talking until after when a friend tells them or they realize their presentation or speech has ended earlier than expected," Claudette Roche, The Accent Coach, explains.

You could even pause to take a breath here and there to help you slow down. I’d even practice breathing techniques before delivering your presentation just to calm yourself so you don’t quickly run through your speech

Luckily, speech coaches, like Roche, offer up many tips on how a person can reduce slow down and communicate properly to their audience. "There are so many tips," Roche states. "I would say start with your breathing. If you find you're gasping for air in between words, slow it down and ensure you breath at a normal rate. It's a really good cue."

"You could even pause to take a breath here and there to help you slow down. I'd even practice breathing techniques before delivering your presentation, just to calm yourself so you don’t quickly run through your speech," Roche adds.

Many speakers choose to specifically pause at points of emphasis. This may get members of the audience thinking, as well as ensure no one misses the point that was just made. "A really good way to do this is to visualize the written word as you go. Where are the commas? Where are the periods? Use that punctuation to guide you and let you know where you need to pause and take a quick inhale," The Accent Coach explains.

Roche elaborates saying that many individuals find it helpful to practice in front of others beforehand to get an idea of their tempo or pace. "I always say it takes practice, and public presentations or speeches really do. If you don’t do them regularly, it pays to take the time to rehearse, get it down, and then present it," Roche states.

visit our website