EHR-related findings calculate a time of 16 minutes per patient
01/25/2020

Meaningful use of EHRs requires eligible clinicians to use Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) in a way MIPS requires them to use.

Online PR News – 25-January-2020 – Ontario, Ca – A study of Cerner’s analytics platform shows that physicians spend an average of 16 minutes and 14 seconds on an EHR per patient. That includes the physician’s time outside of work too. For instance, the doctors have to update EHRs when they are home or on vacation.

It analyzed data of approximately 100 million patient records with 155,000 physicians of nonsurgical fields.

That’s plenty of data to conclude. Below are the three takeaways that we understand from this research:

1. If we categorically split those 16 minutes, one-third of it was consumed on chart review followed by documentation and ordering which covered 24 and 16 percent of the total time respectively. Moreover, 11 percent of that time was spent outside of the usual working hours, i.e. on weekends and after 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekdays.

2. Meaningful use of EHRs requires eligible clinicians to use Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) in a way MIPS requires them to use. Such statistics have their importance also because of the burnout factor on the rise. It was found that the average time that a physician spends on an EHR per patient varied among specialties.

According to Healio, primary care physicians spend the most time on EHRs. They spend nearly 20 minutes on records of each patient.

3. The study finds out the quantity of time spent on EHRs, but not their quality, according to Forbes. There is a need to probe it further to find the exact time spent on irrelevant tasks, EHR’s impact on burnout instances and ways to share some of that burden with the staff. Staff includes scribes, assistants, and practice administrators.