Antacids And Acid Blockers Causing Stomach Troubles
11/06/2009

New book explains that antacids, prescribed to relieve heartburn, acid reflux, and indigestion, have serious side effects.

Online PR News – 06-November-2009 – – A new study* confirms that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), powerful acid blockers, cause the same symptoms–chronic heartburn, indigestion, stomach pain, gas, and bloating–they are meant to cure. In the study, healthy adults with no history of acid reflux developed such symptoms when they stopped taking the drugs after eight weeks of use. Dr. Jonathan Wright’s YOUR STOMACH: WHAT IS REALLY MAKING YOU MISERABLE AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT explains why antacids and acid blockers cause these symptoms as well as other health problems such as osteoporosis and dementia.

PPIs like Prilosec® and Nexium® are among the most widely used prescription medications in the world. And another recent study+ reveals that PPIs are prescribed up to 70% of the time with no verification of need – doctors are writing PPI prescriptions without first testing whether their patients have too much stomach acid. Moreover, long-term use of PPIs is common, with no attempts to discontinue use, despite manufacturers’ warning labels of serious side effects.

Shockingly, the problem may not be too much stomach acid, but too little! Stomach and other maladies—heartburn, bloating, constipation, and indigestion—may all be the result of too little acid. Antacids and acid blockers may be making the problem worse.

Dr. Wright’s YOUR STOMACH explains what really causes heartburn, acid reflux disease, gas, stomach pain, and related complaints and what to do about it. It offers millions of sufferers alternatives to the usual prescriptions that make stomach problems worse.

This powerful little book offers solid scientific information about one of the most common and distressing ailments in America. There is also fascinating information about little known and used all-natural supplements.

* Reimer C, Søndergaard B, Hilsted L, Bytzer P. Gastroenterology. 2009 Jul;137(1):80-7, 87.e1.

+ Reimer C, Bytzer P. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Oct;30(7):725-32.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Jonathan Wright, M.D., is the founder and medical director of Tahoma Clinic in Renton, Washington where he also practices medicine. With an undergraduate degree from Harvard and a medical degree from the University of Michigan, Dr. Wright has been at the forefront of natural biomedical research and treatment since 1973. He has authored/co-authored 11 books, selling over 1.1 million copies, with two texts achieving best selling status: Book of Nutritional Therapy and Guide to Healing with Nutrition. Dr. Wright authors Nutrition and Healing, a monthly newsletter emphasizing nutritional medicine in medical practice that reaches over 110,000 readers worldwide.